40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference

The count down has begun. In almost two months I will be presenting at the 40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference. This is one of my favorite academic conferences so needless to say, I am excited to be able to attend and present. This year’s conference will be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. I’m hoping to get there a day early in order to enjoy some sights and sounds. My presentation is scheduled for Friday, the first day of the conference. Details are blow. Continue reading “40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference”

The Electoral College: Introduction and the 2016 Presidential Race

Well, it’s finally over. The 2016 Presidential election, it’s done. What seemed like a sad reality show come to life finally ended and the results are clear. America chose Hillary Clinton for President. Almost 2.9 million more Americans preferred Clinton, as a matter of fact. Clinton took 48.2% of the popular vote, or 65,844,954 votes to Donald Trump’s 46.1% or 62,979, 879 votes. However, despite Clinton winning in a clear landslide vote vs vote, Donald Trump won the Presidential Election by attaining 306 Electoral Votes to Clinton’s 232; this made Donald President Elect and left Clinton with more votes than any other losing Presidential candidate in U.S. History.  Continue reading “The Electoral College: Introduction and the 2016 Presidential Race”

“A City too Busy to Hate” and Mayor Kasim Reed

Ever since the Civil Rights era the city of Atlanta has often dubbed itself the “city too busy to hate.” Now that the city is in the throes of this generation’s protest, Atlanta seems to be adopting that moniker once more. Check out this inspirational video from 11Alive created after NAACP led protests in the city.  Continue reading ““A City too Busy to Hate” and Mayor Kasim Reed”

LIVE RIGHT NOW: Hundreds Clash During Rally at Stone Mountain

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Displaying and Teaching the Confederate Flag in the Classroom (Part 3)

Bulletin boards can be a unique and useful tool in education if used properly. Due to a lack of funds and resources, field trips to historical sites and structures can represent a challenge. Bulletin Boards help fill that void through visual stimulation. Objects on the board can grab the attention of students, make them think and/or question, and engage them in the current curriculum. When I can, and when resources allow me to, I change the class bulletin board to draw my students’ attention to new material. This past week my U.S. History classes began their unit on the Civil Rights Movement. When I changed the bulletin board for this unit (featured image on the header), I incorporated a new item; something  my students helped create. 
Continue reading “Displaying and Teaching the Confederate Flag in the Classroom (Part 3)”