Nash Farm Battlefield Saga

News broke yesterday that the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum would close by June 1. This came after a request from County Commissioner Dee Clemmons to remove Confederate Battle Flags from inside the museum. Earlier stories indicated that Clemmons also requested all Confederate “paraphernalia” be removed. The news cycle has changed and even the story which included that quote yesterday no longer does. Now that the story has gained more traction, even more information has come to light.  Continue reading “Nash Farm Battlefield Saga”

Removal of Confederate Flag Leads to Museum Closure

News broke today that the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum in Henry County, GA is going to close up shop. This came in apparent response to a request by Dee Clemmons, a County Commissioner, to “remove their Confederate flags and paraphernalia.” You can read about it here but I’ll give a brief summations. The museum is owned by Henry County. Nash Farm Battlefield Museum houses various artifacts and clothing exhibitions as well as history about the farm itself. According to the Henry Herald, much of the museums exhibitions are loans from private citizens. One such citizen pulled his collection. This prompted the County Board to close the museum. I plan to take a more in-depth look at this but I’m going to refrain from doing so at this time. WSB-TV is supposed to run the story at 4PM. This will hopefully provide a better look outlook on what happened.

Brief Comments on Monument Removal

Updates Below


The news of the removal of various Civil War & Reconstruction monuments in New Orleans is certainly making its rounds. I have not devoted a lot of time or energy to commenting on the issue of monument removal thus far, outside of few statements on Facebook and Twitter. However, as someone who grew up in a South where these monuments blanket the countryside, I want to establish my position on this issue.

Continue reading “Brief Comments on Monument Removal”

The Birth of a Nation: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

Back in April I posted about an upcoming film, The Birth of a Nationthat is coming to theaters this year.  I thought then, and still do now, that the movie comes at a much needed time as the country struggles to come to terms with its current racial dilemma. Additionally, I was excited at the prospect of a movie which covers a time and topic in history that is often overlooked; slave rebellions. That was before Gabrielle Union’s op-ed about Nate Parker’s rape allegations grabbed my attention.  Continue reading “The Birth of a Nation: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back”

Donald Trump’s Confederate Flag

After the Charleston Church shooting last year Confederate Flags and iconography suffered tremendous backlash. Most notable of which was the removal of the Confederate Battle Flag (CBF) from the grounds of the South Carolina State House. Naturally, with every backlash comes the counter-backlash. One year later in the midst of a Presidential election, the flag and those that wield it have found a new ally…Donald Trump.  Continue reading “Donald Trump’s Confederate Flag”

LIVE RIGHT NOW: Hundreds Clash During Rally at Stone Mountain

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Displaying and Teaching the Confederate Flag in the Classroom (Part 3)

Bulletin boards can be a unique and useful tool in education if used properly. Due to a lack of funds and resources, field trips to historical sites and structures can represent a challenge. Bulletin Boards help fill that void through visual stimulation. Objects on the board can grab the attention of students, make them think and/or question, and engage them in the current curriculum. When I can, and when resources allow me to, I change the class bulletin board to draw my students’ attention to new material. This past week my U.S. History classes began their unit on the Civil Rights Movement. When I changed the bulletin board for this unit (featured image on the header), I incorporated a new item; something  my students helped create. 
Continue reading “Displaying and Teaching the Confederate Flag in the Classroom (Part 3)”