Nash Farm Battlefield Saga

News broke yesterday that the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum would close by June 1. This came after a request from County Commissioner Dee Clemmons to remove Confederate Battle Flags from inside the museum. Earlier stories indicated that Clemmons also requested all Confederate “paraphernalia” be removed. The news cycle has changed and even the story which included that quote yesterday no longer does. Now that the story has gained more traction, even more information has come to light.  Continue reading “Nash Farm Battlefield Saga”

Removal of Confederate Flag Leads to Museum Closure

News broke today that the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum in Henry County, GA is going to close up shop. This came in apparent response to a request by Dee Clemmons, a County Commissioner, to “remove their Confederate flags and paraphernalia.” You can read about it here but I’ll give a brief summations. The museum is owned by Henry County. Nash Farm Battlefield Museum houses various artifacts and clothing exhibitions as well as history about the farm itself. According to the Henry Herald, much of the museums exhibitions are loans from private citizens. One such citizen pulled his collection. This prompted the County Board to close the museum. I plan to take a more in-depth look at this but I’m going to refrain from doing so at this time. WSB-TV is supposed to run the story at 4PM. This will hopefully provide a better look outlook on what happened.

Brief Comments on Monument Removal

Updates Below


The news of the removal of various Civil War & Reconstruction monuments in New Orleans is certainly making its rounds. I have not devoted a lot of time or energy to commenting on the issue of monument removal thus far, outside of few statements on Facebook and Twitter. However, as someone who grew up in a South where these monuments blanket the countryside, I want to establish my position on this issue.

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Museum of the American Revolution

On April 19 the Museum of the American Revolution officially opened in Philadelphia, PA. As a historian with an interest in early American this absolutely tickles my fancy and I hope to make it up there soon. Be sure to check out their website or follow them on Twitter.

 

 

 

From the Holler!

I keep telling myself to update the blog and I keep neglecting to do so. In my defense, I’ve been busy. Closing out another school year at the high school and college level = a lot of grading for me. Additionally, I’ve been going through the process of moving from one school to another, which is always taxing. Finally, as it turns out, owning your own house is a lot of work. But with the Summer approaching and some free-time sure to come, I do plan on updating the blog more frequently. That being said, here are some newsworthy items.

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Unpacking and Unpacking ASA

It’s been a while since my last post but not without reasons For starters, another wrestling season in the the books. The team had a pretty good run this year and I couldn’t be prouder. In other news, I finally closed on a house. Signed the papers on March 3rd (Friday), moved in over the next two days. Then, the next weekend, I went to the annual Appalachian Studies Conference. So needless to say, I’ve been busy and I still haven’t unpacked everything…it’s a process. Nor have I had the opportunity to unpack the various sessions and highlights of this year’s conference; post forthcoming. Now that I seem to have gotten over this hill of a busy schedule, I plan on updating the blog on a more frequent basis. Starting with a follow up post about this year’s ASA Conference. Until then, enjoy this piece from the legendary and recently deceased Chuck Berry.

40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference

The count down has begun. In almost two months I will be presenting at the 40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference. This is one of my favorite academic conferences so needless to say, I am excited to be able to attend and present. This year’s conference will be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. I’m hoping to get there a day early in order to enjoy some sights and sounds. My presentation is scheduled for Friday, the first day of the conference. Details are blow. Continue reading “40th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference”

Guest Post: Why I Marched on January 21, 2017

Yesterday the Women’s March took place. If the captivating images of this event are any indicator, I have no doubt I will one day teach this to my U.S. History classes. Unfortunately, my duties as a wrestling coach kept me from participating in this historic event. This left me following the march in spirit as I read posts, watched videos, and looked at photos from many of my friends in attendance. One such friend, Isabel Otero, was kind enough to put her emotions into words and provide this guest post. Her second on this blog.
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The Electoral College: Introduction and the 2016 Presidential Race

Well, it’s finally over. The 2016 Presidential election, it’s done. What seemed like a sad reality show come to life finally ended and the results are clear. America chose Hillary Clinton for President. Almost 2.9 million more Americans preferred Clinton, as a matter of fact. Clinton took 48.2% of the popular vote, or 65,844,954 votes to Donald Trump’s 46.1% or 62,979, 879 votes. However, despite Clinton winning in a clear landslide vote vs vote, Donald Trump won the Presidential Election by attaining 306 Electoral Votes to Clinton’s 232; this made Donald President Elect and left Clinton with more votes than any other losing Presidential candidate in U.S. History.  Continue reading “The Electoral College: Introduction and the 2016 Presidential Race”